Home » Reading Hemingway Through Wittgenstein / Reading Wittgenstein Through Hemingway by Paul Devlin
Reading Hemingway Through Wittgenstein / Reading Wittgenstein Through Hemingway Paul Devlin

Reading Hemingway Through Wittgenstein / Reading Wittgenstein Through Hemingway

Paul Devlin

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 About the Book 

Paul Devlin is a Ph.D. student in the English Department at SUNY Stony Brook. He is the editor of Rifftide: The Life and Opinions of Papa Jo Jones, as told to Albert Murray (University of Minnesota Press, 2011) and has contributed to Albert MurrayMorePaul Devlin is a Ph.D. student in the English Department at SUNY Stony Brook. He is the editor of Rifftide: The Life and Opinions of Papa Jo Jones, as told to Albert Murray (University of Minnesota Press, 2011) and has contributed to Albert Murray and the Aesthetic Imagination of a Nation (University of Alabama Press, 2010) and African American National Biography (Oxford University Press, 2008). Pauls freelance writing has appeared in Slate, The Root, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Antioch Review, The New York Times Book Review, The Daily Beast, Capital New York, and The Brooklyn Rail. In Reading Heminway Through Wittgenstein / Reading Wittgenstein Through Hemingway, Paul offers a close comparative reading of The Old Man and the Sea and Islands in the Stream alongside Wittgensteins Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, Philosophical Investigations, A Lecture on Ethics and Lectures on Aesthetics. In the process, Paul explores the shared influence of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on Hemingway and Wittgenstein, and suggests the possible influence of Ralph Waldo Emerson, along with mentioning the influences of Tolstoy and World War I. This idiosyncratic and wide-ranging study attempts to show that Hemingway and Wittgenstein were thinking very much along the same lines when it came to ethics, aesthetics, the sublime, and what could and could not be expressed precisely and accurately through language. By considering Hemingway and Wittgenstein (individuals with very different reputations, but with more in common that might have previously been imagined) together, this study seeks to open up new ways of thinking about both of their oeuvres, while also offering a new perspective on the history of ideas in the early-mid twentieth century.